Italian farmers visited Kopenhagen Fur

18 February 2016Fur farming

Emneord

Italienske farmere

A group of around 15 Italian farmers visited Kopenhagen Fur during the auction to learn about the auction house and skin quality. For most of the farmers, it was their first time, but the few that had been to Kopenhagen Fur before also had an educational experience.

 

During their stay, they visited the lab, the creative head quarter KiCK in central Copenhagen, saw the auction and participated in a short sorting course. Emanuele Invernizzi was one of the farmers visiting. He has a farm with 1.000 females in Mahogany, Brown, Palomino and White. He is relatively new to the business having had his farm for four years now. It was his first time to Kopenhagen Fur, and it was a very good and educational experience. 

- I was very interested to know Kopenhagen Fur and see how they work. I think it is important for a farmer to know this part too because it helps a lot understanding the many aspects of both farming and the process after the skins leave the farm. I think the most important lesson was to see how the skins were classified, the criterias for classification and to see the problems on the skins, damages and many other features on the skin like clarity, color and so on. It is not very simple for a new farmer. It was a good chance for us to get a better understanding about the skin quality and I am confident that this visit will make me a better mink farmer, says Emanuele Invernizzi.

For the Italian mink farmer Pozza Luciano, it is the third time at Kopenhagen Fur, but it has not made the visit less interesting. On the contrary, a lot has happed since he visited for the first time.

- It has been an interesting experience and I truly appreciate the sorting course. Hopefully it will help improve the quality on the Italian skins. I actually found this visit my most interesting one because it is fascinating to see how Kopenhagen Fur has developed, for instance the machines that has automatized a part of the sorting process and then just to see how the quality has risen, says Pozza Luciano.     

Italy has around 30 farms.